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Berkeleyside: Kids get new perspective on plastic, make eco-art

Posted on December 18, 2014 at 1:45 PM Comments comments (0)

A Kid by Nature's Trash-to-Treasure project was featured in this article by Ann Spivak in the Berkeleyside, Kids get new perspective on plastic, make eco-art by Ann Spivak . We just had to share it.


What's nature got to do with it?

Posted on December 17, 2014 at 2:05 PM Comments comments (0)

Why give children a well-rounded education?



One of the more celebrated books on the subject of children and their relationship with nature is “Last Child in the Woods” written by Richard Louv. In his book, Louv refers to an educator named John Rick who is “dismayed that nature has disappeared from the classroom, except for discussions of environmental catastrophe.” Rick states “we have industrialized the classroom to the extent that there is no room for nature in the curriculum.” And he goes on to say “ a well-rounded education would mean learning the basics (reaching and writing), to become part of a society that cherished nature, while at the same time contributing to the well-being of mankind.

The Nature Kids Institute: Creating Outdoor Traditions

Posted on December 17, 2014 at 1:30 PM Comments comments (1)

This excerpt was taken from  the Nature Kids Institute blog by Kenny Balentine: Create Outdoor Traditions This Holiday Season!


"My challenge to you is to examine your family traditions and to take at least one of them outdoors! This could be a family snowman building contest every New Year's Day, leaf-pile jumping on Thanksgiving, or perhaps your family can start recognizing International Mud Day every June! Give kids something to look forward to and something to rely upon!


Our traditions and routines have an enormous impact on our children's worldview. They help kids decide what life is all about and they help to develop deep emotional bonds. Those emotional bonds can be focused around movies, football games, and hysterical consumerism... OR, they can be tied to all that is real, living, wondrous and beautiful. May we all find time this holiday season to create and enjoy some outdoor traditions with our families!"


What an inspired message. Please take a look at his blog. We here at a Kid by Nature couldn't agree more. 

 



AKBN Hero: Richard Louv

Posted on December 17, 2014 at 3:40 AM Comments comments (0)

 

"We have such a brief opportunity to pass on to our children our love for this Earth…. In my children’s memories, the adventures we’ve had together in nature will always exist.” — Richard Louv

 

 



Richard Louv is a journalist and author who investigate what happens when humans separate themselves from Nature. Think about yourself. When you go for a long walk in the woods or spend a day by the ocean, how do you feel? Mr. Louv has written eight books but is most famous for his book Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder. In this book, Mr. Louv explains why time in nature can help kids (and grownups) be healthier and learn better. Click here to learn more about him. 


Join A Kid By Nature on Facebook and tell us your favorite place to spend a day outdoors.


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Listen to Richard Louv talk about wonder, and why our connection to nature is critical to healthy development.

Monet without nature

Posted on December 16, 2014 at 2:25 PM Comments comments (0)

Just imagine, no water lilies for Monet


Article and image from The Nature Conservancy: Nature in Art




Can you imagine walking through an art museum and not seeing any trees? No mountains or streams, sunrises or sunsets? No birds or horses? No boats on rough waves or relaxing landscapes?


It’s impossible, because nature is everywhere in art – from the literal to the abstract inspiration provided by the textures, colors and sounds of the natural world.


Being outdoors can lift our spirits and stoke our creativity. The beauty of nature reflected in art is just another reminder of our need to protect it.


From the beginning of human history, nature has played a vital role in our creative expression. The lands and waters we rely on for daily survival shape how we view and interpret the world around us. And in turn, the art we create from nature’s inspiration becomes part of our personal and cultural identity. Nature’s beauty and power is ingrained in our lives, our history and our culture. By conserving nature, we are helping nurture our artistic spirit and ensuring that future generations will continue to find inspiration in the natural world around us.

Kids and asthma

Posted on December 11, 2014 at 1:45 PM Comments comments (2)

Connecting the dots between asthma, children and plastic


Excerpt and image from: theguardian.com September 18, 2014 Chemicals in some household plastics lined to child asthma risk


“New research from Columbia University finds children exposed to a substance found in common household plastics are 70% more likely to develop asthma between the agens of 5 and 12.” Findings from Columbia University researcher Robin Whyatt and her team at the Mailman School of Public Health have published findings “linking the children’s respiratory and neurological issues to various environmental toxins, including exposure to phthalates – chemical binders found in many household cleaners, personal care products and food packaging – as well as insecticides and pesticide residues.”


Secret pathways

Posted on December 10, 2014 at 2:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Polystyrene pathways probably won’t lead to pristine beaches?


Excerpt from https://journeytotheplasticocean.wordpress.com/2013/02/18/what-will-our-legacy-for-our-children-be/" target="_blank">What will our legacy for our children be? by 1plasticmum


“Mum I found a secret way through the bushes to get to a rocky outcrop? All you have to do is follow the polystyrene path! He said this in such a matter of fact way . . . just follow the polystyrene path. As I scrambled through the buses following Finn on the path that really was mostly made up of decades old broken pieces of foam I tried to recall my secret hideouts as a child. Of course there was some litter . . . there were things that people threw carelessly out of car windows . . . but luckily I grew up just before this massive addition to plastic, especially bottles. So when we found a secret river it was not already littered with detritus that had blown or floated in mass quantities. What will Finn think of when he looks back on his childhood? Will he remember walking on beaches covered with trash? Or will things be so different in the future that a trashed beach will be an oddity?

AKBN Hero: Rachel Carson

Posted on December 9, 2014 at 4:35 PM Comments comments (1)

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts.” — Rachel Carson


Rachel Carson, 1940, Fish & Wildlife Service  employee photo

When Rachel Carson was a little girl, the two things she loved most were animals and writing stories. She often had animal characters in her stories. Ms. Carson grew up to become a marine biologist during a time when not many women went into this field. She became concerned about pesticides when she saw how they affected fish and other marine life. (Pesticides are any chemical meant to kill insects.)


In 1957, Ms. Carson saw how the United States Department of Agriculture fought fire ants by spraying pesticides mixed with fuel oil. She wondered how this affected all the animals in the areas sprayed, and soon realized that the fire ants caused less damage to the environment than the spraying did. Ms. Carson wrote a book called Silent Spring, which explained how the pesticide DDT killed not just insects but the birds and fish who ate those insects as well as bigger animals who ate the poisoned fish and birds. The title Silent Spring refers to how quiet it becomes when pesticides kill all the songbirds. Many people call Ms. Carson “the conscience of a nation” because she worked so hard to make sure the lives of animals weren’t forgotten. Because of Rachel Carson, people understood more about protecting the Earth and all its creatures.


Watch a short video about Rachel Carson’s life. Join A Kid By Nature on Facebook and tell us which animals you are most concerned about right now. Will this affect what work you choose to do when you’re an adult?


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AKBN Hero: Pam Longobardi

Posted on November 13, 2014 at 4:00 PM Comments comments (0)

photo courtesy of Pam Longobardi


Pam Longobardi is an artist and an art professor who collects plastic debris and sometimes has to swim to collect her art materials. She cleans up beaches, sea coves, and even dives into the ocean to pick up floating trash. She has removed thousands of pounds of garbage from the sea and the shoreline, and she makes beautiful art work from the trash she gathers. What do you think of Pam’s art. Would you like to make art from the trash you pick up on Coastal Cleanup Day? What does it mean for marine life that so much trash is in our oceans?

Environmental Art & Used Toy Drive

Posted on October 31, 2014 at 3:10 AM Comments comments (0)


WHAT: Environmental Art & Used Toy Drive 


WHO: Students at Jefferson Elementary School and Rosa Parks Elementary School

 

WHEN: October & November 2014

 

WHY: Kids learn when they’re having fun. This project teaches environmental awareness, gets children into nature, and shows what can be accomplished by a group. Earth stewardship is our goal; having fun is our priority!

 

Who’s behind this project? A Kid By Nature.

 

Thank you to Rosa Parks Elementary School in Berkeley for participating in the pilot program for environmental art and used toy drive. It was a fun and educational event.


 


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